{READ KINDLE} õ A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy ð eBook or E-pub free

Published in 2015, former justice to the ICC, Thomas Buergenthal discusses his survival during the Holocaust So important to have survivors record their story so that future generations may never forget. I m always interested in the stories about how people survived the hardships of WWII particularly the Holocust This book was written by a boy who survived many events in his childhood including being in no man s land which was a place between countries to a Jewish ghetto in Poland, to death camps and work camps He was about 10 when he went on the Auschwitz Death March He attributes his success to many things including luck, his Aryan appearance, his ability to speak multiple languages, and I m always interested in the stories about how people survived the hardships of WWII particularly the Holocust This book was written by a boy who survived many events in his childhood including being in no man s land which was a place between countries to a Jewish ghetto in Poland, to death camps and work camps He was about 10 when he went on the Auschwitz Death March He attributes his success to many things including luck, his Aryan appearance, his ability to speak multiple languages, and his child s view of not thinking about the future He doesn t remember alot of details, but some are very specific Some of his story is fun like being adopted for awhile by the Polish Army who took him with them to invade Berlin Most however are similar to other peoples stories He was the youngest child to survive any of the camps he was in Mostly children were exterminated Some details were filled in later when he was contacted by others One man he met Odd Nansen kept him entertained while in the hospital ward, later he realized Nansen also probably kept him alive by paying orderlies with tobacco Odd Nansen published his diaries and Tommy gained some notariaty in Sweden But his friendship which developedafter the war with Mr Nansen proved to influence Thomas greatly by introducing him to important people, like Albert Schweitzer and giving him a role model in Humanitarian aid Odd Nansen is said to be one of the founders of Unicef Thomas became a Humanitarian as well, and is now a Justice in the International Court and has a back ground in Human Rights The epilogue of this book comments oncurrent human rights issues such as the continuing use of genocide He reminds us of Rawanda, El Salvador, and other places where people have been systematically exterminated In all Buergenthal gives a unique perspective of his childhood, tempered by his years of experience in Human Rights I recommend this book to any who are interested in this type of memoir or human rights.Years later I still think of this book I added an extra star because of it I have been corrected about him being the youngest at his camp However there are many things about this book that make me consider human rights I am glad to have read it and recommend it whole heartedly One of the best Holocaust accounts I have read A wonderful quote It is important not to hold the descendants of the perpetrators responsible for what was done to us, lest the cycle of hate and violence never end If this were applied to race relations in America, it would eliminate so much hate and harm. Having just undergone eye muscle surgery, I chose to read this as an audiobook borrowed from my local library I confess that I was medicated and perhaps at times drifted in and out but it was a fascinating book telling the story as he remembers it of Thomas Buergenthal s life as a boy growing up during the war living in ghetto s , Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen That he managed to survive all do these experiences he puts down to luck knowing that sounds odd, and to the length of time he spent Having just undergone eye muscle surgery, I chose to read this as an audiobook borrowed from my local library I confess that I was medicated and perhaps at times drifted in and out but it was a fascinating book telling the story as he remembers it of Thomas Buergenthal s life as a boy growing up during the war living in ghetto s , Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen That he managed to survive all do these experiences he puts down to luck knowing that sounds odd, and to the length of time he spent drifting into hell which prepared him to survive He spoke Polish and German fluently and a little English which proved helpful at many times even allowing him to pass as a Polish child for some months He literally escaped death after being shot as part of a mass execution managing to get up from where he was shot and escape into a neighbouring camp where he quickly found his father The story if full of close calls.The audio book has both the preview and prologue parts read by the author and while his voice was a little flat at times, I appreciated hearing him speak his own thoughts The reader of the bulk of the book did an excellent job too In the closing section read by the author we learnedof his after the war He ultimately became a lawyer specializing in human rights cases and spent much time for example dealing in some of the roughest cases in Central America He was also involved in attempts to get money from Swiss bank accounts back to the rightful owners and it was quite shocking to hear how the banks had been taking advantage of that money over time After all of his experiences he could have chosen to hate He did not and made it clear that the sins of the fathers should not be visited upon their children.This was an excellent read and I highly recommend it Holocaust memoirs are so important and becomeover time They are the eye witness reports of atrocities that would otherwise have been forgotten and swept under the rug The memoirs show us what truly happened and how people s lives were affected, both during and after Thomas Buergenthal tells his story from a distance of 55 years This gives his memories a somewhat unemotional telling but one that is deep and touching One can see the pain he witnessed and experienced through that filter Holocaust memoirs are so important and becomeover time They are the eye witness reports of atrocities that would otherwise have been forgotten and swept under the rug The memoirs show us what truly happened and how people s lives were affected, both during and after Thomas Buergenthal tells his story from a distance of 55 years This gives his memories a somewhat unemotional telling but one that is deep and touching One can see the pain he witnessed and experienced through that filter of time From this atrocity of the Holocaust, Thomas emerged as a wonderful human being who understands that the cycle of horror and pain has to be stopped He s doing his part to stop that cycle of hatred retaliation and turning it to understanding and acceptance The task ahead for mankind is to strengthen these tools international law , not to despair, and to never believe that mankind is incapable of creating a world in which our grandchildren and their descendants can live in peace and enjoy the human rights that were denied to so many of my Thomas generation A touching memoir of a young child s survival of the Holocaust This book was not as graphic as many Holocaust books I have read and the thought provoking nature of the work makes it a must read I particularly recommend the epilogue It is a very thought provoking look into international human rights law As much as th UN is corrupt, I have wondered about international court bodies particularly when state sovereignty is disregarded for international rule I think the author provides a very co A touching memoir of a young child s survival of the Holocaust This book was not as graphic as many Holocaust books I have read and the thought provoking nature of the work makes it a must read I particularly recommend the epilogue It is a very thought provoking look into international human rights law As much as th UN is corrupt, I have wondered about international court bodies particularly when state sovereignty is disregarded for international rule I think the author provides a very compelling argument for international courts and such organizations I would love to have this discussion in a group of people who are well versed in the pros and cons of international law The author puts into words a taught I have had many times while reading of the atrocities of the Holocaust it frightens me terribly that the individuals committing these acts are for the most part not sadists, but ordinary people who go home in the evenings to their families, washing their hands before sitting down to dinner, as if what they had been doing was just a job like any other If we humans can so easily wash the blood of our fellow humans off our hands, then what hope is there for sparing future generations from a repeat of the genocides ans mass killings of the past The Holocaust was perpetrated by neighbors, friends, husbands, wives, sons, daughters regular people That is one thing I like about this book Buergenthal highlights individuals and gives them credit for their impact in his life, even saving his life at times Individuals killed millions one at a time, but other individuals saved countless others and continue to do so today one at a time This is another book that I can t possibly rate It s not that I am opposed to rating all memoirs It sI am opposed to it when it is someone who has been through a situation I can t begin to ever understand ex other war memoirs, kidnappings etc Maybe it means I m a softie All I know is to strip someone s experience, an experience that was a major if not the major event in their life, down to stars is something I cannot do So you will rarely see it in my reviews That being said, Buerg This is another book that I can t possibly rate It s not that I am opposed to rating all memoirs It sI am opposed to it when it is someone who has been through a situation I can t begin to ever understand ex other war memoirs, kidnappings etc Maybe it means I m a softie All I know is to strip someone s experience, an experience that was a major if not the major event in their life, down to stars is something I cannot do So you will rarely see it in my reviews That being said, Buergenthal s story of survival brought goosebumps to my arms and tears to my eyes He truly feels lucky to have made it and I feel lucky that he decided to tell his story I wrote this review as a reflection paper for my Public International Law class so it does not read like many of my other reviews Still I hope you enjoy During undergrad I took a class on the Literature of Genocide My professor s mother was a survivor of the Armenian Genocide and he only taught that one class every spring I began the semester believing we would talk about only the holocaust we would read Night by Elie Wiesel and be done with it I was completely wrong Literature of Gen I wrote this review as a reflection paper for my Public International Law class so it does not read like many of my other reviews Still I hope you enjoy During undergrad I took a class on the Literature of Genocide My professor s mother was a survivor of the Armenian Genocide and he only taught that one class every spring I began the semester believing we would talk about only the holocaust we would read Night by Elie Wiesel and be done with it I was completely wrong Literature of Genocide opened my eyes to the world around me and spurred my interest in International Law After that class, for a long time, I couldn t read anything having to do with genocide, the holocaust, or even World War II My mind couldn t believe what it was reading and my heart couldn t stand to watch another family broken apart, to witness a millionpeople die I must admit, The Lucky Child was the first book, about the holocaust, I have read since Literature of Genocide and I m glad that it was Buergenthal s holocaust survival story is different then most I enjoyed the way he tackled events chronologically It didn t begin with him arriving at Auschwitz It began with him being a happy boy, a child with two loving parents, who happened to be Jewish Buergenthal grew up on the pages before my eyes He transformed for a small boy escaping with his parents to Poland, to a survivor of ghettos and labor camps, and the mascot of the polish army Buergenthal credits his survival to luck I believe it was because he was a survivor he was strong in the face of adversity and, at times, completely fearless The things he witnessed at such a young age are unimaginable for most people I understand why it took until his later life for him to write this memoir He needed the distance that only time can provide My favorite aspect of the memoir was Buergenthal s discussion on survivor s guilt The author admits that he never suffered from survivors guilt because he fully credits his survival to luck that he was never the most brave, or afraid, or most anything, he was just a lucky child born under a fortunate star At first I took issue with this idea I have a hard time crediting luck with anything I am firm in my belief that we make our own luck and then let the chips fall where they may Buergenthal s survival story made me questions this belief Had it not been for his parents hiding him in Poland when all the other children were rounded up, his usefulness to the boss at the polish work camp, the Nazi s not checking his train car on arrival at Auschwitz, the doctor befriending him when he became sick in the ghetto, and a multitude of other lucky coincidences Buergenthal would not be alive today Call it what you may, fortune, divine intervention, survival, but Buergenthal was a lucky boy.Buergenthal s story didn t end once Auschwtiz was liberated So many memoires end when the Polish, American, or Russia troops reached the gates of the various camps It is at this point that Buergenthal s story really begins He is adopted by the polish army and becomes their mascot before being taken to an orphanage to wait for any news of his parents The tone of the story changed when Buergenthal was at the orphanage The optimistic ten year old is confronted with what has happened to him and millions of others in the camps and how society doesn t, or can t, believe it I was overjoyed when, while at the orphanage, Buergenthal received word that his mother had survived It seemed impossible that these two would ever be reunited and Buergenthal again credited luck My one qualm with this book was that after Buergenthal was reunited with his mother things began to drag for me I immensely enjoyed the beginning if the memoir, Auschwitz, his time with the polish army, and to a certain extent his orphanage experience but after Buergenthal was reunited with his mother the memoir read less like a memoir andlike a list of things that happened to have occurred Brief mentions of his mothers new husbands, the Nuremberg trials, moving to America, and Buergenthal becoming a Judge with the International Court of Justice These are all very interesting events that have shaped him greatly and spurred him to write his memoir I wish the reader was givendescription and explanation for this time in Buergenthal s life Although, perhaps that may come later if he chooses to write a memoir on working on the International Court of Justice I enjoyed The Lucky Child It was different from any other Holocaust, or even Auschwitz specific, memoir I had ever read It was interesting to see what time does to one s memories of a genocide and to see how such a young survivor coped Buergenthal is a truly unique man and I am glad to have read his memoir {READ KINDLE} Ø A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy ¾ Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir A Lucky ChildHe arrived at Auschwitz at ageafter surviving two ghettos and a labor camp Separated first from his mother and then his father, Buergenthal managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and inarrived in the US to start a new life Now dedicated to helping those subjected to tyranny throughout the world, Buergenthal writes his story with a simple clarity that highlights the stark details of unimaginable hardship A Lucky Child is a book that demands to be read by all Before I opened this book I looked at the cover a long time, it shows a young and happy family, a young cherub faced boy and I thought to myself, they do not look Jewishbut then I thought how in the late 40s and 50s in this country people had very perceptive radar as to what anyone s national background was As a child, I went no where that I wasn t immediately recognized as coming from Irish stock, true I had freckles which seemed to never deface any British face I knewand looking back at Before I opened this book I looked at the cover a long time, it shows a young and happy family, a young cherub faced boy and I thought to myself, they do not look Jewishbut then I thought how in the late 40s and 50s in this country people had very perceptive radar as to what anyone s national background was As a child, I went no where that I wasn t immediately recognized as coming from Irish stock, true I had freckles which seemed to never deface any British face I knewand looking back at photos I only saw and American child Yet even into my 20s and 30s the first thing most people commented on was my Irishness, In spite of the fact my family had been here for generations, and with that was the assumption that I was a Papist Today only a few would have that special cultural based face recognition Growing up my family knew many Jewish people primarily because my father in his youth during the Depression had been a Shabbat goy, and had come to know many Jewish families, most of whom he admired Post war due to the low pay of an U.S Officer, we lived in a Jewish neighborhood in Far Rockaway, filled with recent emigres and Jews who had lived here for generations The only people I recognized as Jews were the were the ultra orthodox because of their dress I obviously did not have the capacity for special facial recognition.In every story about Holocaust survivors is the standard reality that people turned in others for appearing Jewish, even people who had lived in their countries since the 1200s, were totally assimilated, often non practicing and intermarried I began to realize as I got older that people who don t like a group or feel threatened by it have different antenna than the rest of us that allowed people to turn in neighbors who might have been practicing Catholics or Lutherans for generations, immediately identifying them as Jews.Another thing I always ponder that seems inexplicable to me was noted By Thomas In January 1945, Germany was fighting for its basic survival, and yet the Nazi regime was willing to use its rapidly dwindling resources.rail facilities, fuel and troops.to move half starved and dying prisoners from Poland to Germany Was it to keep us from falling into the hands of the Allies or to maintain Germany s slave labor supply The lunacy of it all is hard to fathom, unless one thinks of it as a game concocted by the inmates of an asylum for the criminally insane pg 97I think of the madness that descended on Budapest in the final weeks before it fell, the utter lawlessness, and yet in this atmosphere Eichmann was undeterred and was driven to round up every remaining Jew even if he had to force march them toward rail lines that had been blown up, even if it required to force march them hundreds of miles to their extermination To me that level of sheer hatred was always difficult to understandhow even as you life is threatened you must risk all to insure that others will die in the proscribed manner.This is a moving and interesting story of a very young boy who through sheer luck survived many selections that should have led to his early demiselike most survivors it was sheer luck where survival might mean just having a proper pair of shoes, or some other slim happen chance The author tells his story through the eyes of a child which did shield him from some of the horror around him I have known survivors both of the Holocaust and of wars whose trauma has scared them deeply, some especially those who were children havesuccess in keeping the flashbacks at bay than even young adults who had a deeper understanding of what they were caught up in.Thomas story also speaks to the fact that no one who is alone survives, it took the small interventions of many people to keep him alive, whether it was those who gave him hope or those who actually risked much to change his card and maneuvered to keep him off of the kill list Survival often meant sheer luck and who was drawn to you who were trying to keep you alive even at risk of their own life, while others now faceless and nameless were eliminated in the first selection.Thomas Buergenthal did pay back the universe whose strange fate spared him by becoming a major human rights litigator I have had many people ask me how I can bear to read Holocaust stories, perhaps it is because my mind wants to make sense of it, where their is little sense to be made, perhaps it is to recognize the early warning signs of what creates the possibility of genocide, perhaps it is to honor those now dead who passed through my life, their stories disappearing with them as though they had never been I don t know even myself, but within them I find morsels of hope and the indefatigable spirit of human beings