@Download E-pub Û Citizen Soldiers: The US Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany ⚝ eBook or Kindle ePUB free

@Download E-pub ⚛ Citizen Soldiers: The US Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany Ø From Stephen E Ambrose, bestselling author of Band of Brothers and D Day, the inspiring story of the ordinary men of the US army in northwest Europe from the day after D Day until the end of the bitterest days of World War IIIn this riveting account, historian Stephen E Ambrose continues where he left off in hisbestseller D Day Citizen Soldiers opens athours, June on the Normandy beaches, and ends athours, May with the allied victory It is biography of the US Army in the European Theater of Operations, and Ambrose again follows the individual characters of this noble, brutal, and tragic war From the high command down to the ordinary soldier, Ambrose draws on hundreds of interviews to re create the war experience with startling clarity and immediacy From the hedgerows of Normandy to the overrunning of Germany, Ambrose tells the real story of World War II from the perspective of the men and women who fought it I m on a little world war II kick right now and I realized that this book would basically tell me what my grandfather and Kate s grandfather were doing in 1944 Turns out, things were not that fun for them Although, thank god my grandfather was in the anti aircraft part of the army, because if he had been in the front line infantry, according to this book, chances are I would not be around There are lots of great first person stories of the war here, although it is a little jumpy all around be I m on a little world war II kick right now and I realized that this book would basically tell me what my grandfather and Kate s grandfather were doing in 1944 Turns out, things were not that fun for them Although, thank god my grandfather was in the anti aircraft part of the army, because if he had been in the front line infantry, according to this book, chances are I would not be around There are lots of great first person stories of the war here, although it is a little jumpy all around between armies and corps and divisions and stuff I would make one suggestion to readers of this book If you re like me, you ll keep saying to yourself, wait, ok, division 30 of the 1st Army, when did he talk about them before Where were they Wait, what town are they at again Were they the ones from that story with the river and the big battle When these questions come up, you just have to ignore them Maybe if you are a vet yourself, you can keep track of all these groups, but I just can t do it It s impossible to keep flipping back to the text and maps and find everybody I would just ignore the numbers and read it for the stories The other thing you get out of this book is, if ONLY that eyepatch tom cruise guy had managed to kill Hitler like he wanted to That was July of 44 The war went on another year almost, even though everyone with a brain in Germany knew they were going to lose But if they gave up, Hitler would have them shot for treason So they had to keep fighting So they wasted hundreds of thousands of German and Allied lives for absolutely no reason at all It just makes you sick only in the extremity of total war does a society give so much responsibility for life and death decision making to men so young I have read other books by Stephen E Ambrose Among them Band of Brothers E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler s Eagle s Nest and D Day June 6, 1944 The Climactic Battle of World War II One of the things I like about the author is the readability of his books and that you feel like you get to know the people Their thoughts and ex only in the extremity of total war does a society give so much responsibility for life and death decision making to men so young I have read other books by Stephen E Ambrose Among them Band of Brothers E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler s Eagle s Nest and D Day June 6, 1944 The Climactic Battle of World War II One of the things I like about the author is the readability of his books and that you feel like you get to know the people Their thoughts and experiences.Citizen Soldiers The U S Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany begins on June 7, 1944 and continues through May 7, 1945 During this time there are the battles in the hedgerows of Normandy, Operation Market Garden, the battles in the Hurtgen Forest, the Battle of the Bulge, and the capture of the bridge at Remagen I have read books about D Day and Operation Overlord and I know about the training that went into it I did not know the allied soldiers were not really prepared for what came after the landing on the beaches It was a learning process How to fight in the hedgerows How to cross rivers How to fight in a city How to coordinate air and ground campaigns.There were, of course, chapters on these different campaigns and battles but some of the chapters that I found most interesting were those on the medics nurses and doctors, the sad sacks and profiteers, and on the replacement system I had not realized that many of the soldiers were sent into battle with little or no training And the casualty rate showed it.This was war and there is plenty of horror that goes with it Such as executing a person rather than taking him prisoner But there were moments when humanity surfaced Such as an Easter service with both G.I s and German civilians participating There were occasional moments when I had a laugh, or at least smiled Such as when a G.I was hunting for food He shot at a deer He missed but 5 German soldiers came out of the forest with their hands raised.You cannot write about WWII without discussing Eisenhower, Bradley, Patton, and Montgomery They are all here but for the most part it is from the viewpoint of how their decisions impacted the GI on the front line Such as not having winter gear because a general in the rear believed the war would be over by December.The author did a wonderful job of research and interviews With Americans and Germans But I didn t see anything with a British or French soldier It was not just America vs Germany It would have been interesting to read about the experience and viewpoint of other allies When I was finished reading this book my appreciation for the young citizen soldiers who participated was renewed again I ve been thinking a lot about story structure lately How many wonderful stories books or movies have a structure something like this Hero reluctantly gets involved in a struggle Hero faces setbacks, makes mistakes, takes a few steps forward and then a few steps back Hero learns, grows, and changes on way to achieving goal Hero has to make some sacrifices, but comes out on top.I love Stephen Ambrose He makes history read like a good novel Citizen Soldiers was packed with information It I ve been thinking a lot about story structure lately How many wonderful stories books or movies have a structure something like this Hero reluctantly gets involved in a struggle Hero faces setbacks, makes mistakes, takes a few steps forward and then a few steps back Hero learns, grows, and changes on way to achieving goal Hero has to make some sacrifices, but comes out on top.I love Stephen Ambrose He makes history read like a good novel Citizen Soldiers was packed with information It was interesting to read The way Ambrose told it, the US Army was the hero learning how to fight in hedgerow country, learning how to fight in a city, getting surprised in the Ardennes, making some mistakes with the Repple Depples and Market Garden, but ultimately pushing through and triumphing Maybe that is why World War Two is still something so many people love to study.Ambrose does a good job of giving the reader a broad picture of what was happening with the US Army in Northern Europe He doesn t cover the Pacific Theater or what was happening in Italy He does give praise where it is due and criticism where it is deserved Great read, even if I did laugh when he talked about the Red Army liberating the Baltic states and Eastern Europe I doubt they felt like they were being liberatedlike being conquered by a different army Ambrose, an incredibly prolific and readable historian, focuses in this book on the soldiers who made up the ETO European Theater of Operations It s at first somewhat difficult to categorize His analysis of the men who made up the army could almost be called cheer leading of the most nauseating kind But after he settles in, the reality becomesapparent They weren t all great guys and upstanding citizens He points out that some thirty percent of supplies coming into ports after the in Ambrose, an incredibly prolific and readable historian, focuses in this book on the soldiers who made up the ETO European Theater of Operations It s at first somewhat difficult to categorize His analysis of the men who made up the army could almost be called cheer leading of the most nauseating kind But after he settles in, the reality becomesapparent They weren t all great guys and upstanding citizens He points out that some thirty percent of supplies coming into ports after the invasion of Europe were stolen for resale on the black market The picture of Milo in Catch 22 is not the grossest exaggeration Racial problems were endemic at all levels, but Ambrose reserves his harshest judgment for the upper echelon commanders who remained clean, dry, and well fed in the rear while front line troops were asked to take objectives that often made little sense at great cost Thousands of GI s were lost to trench foot and frostbite during the winter because the boots they were issued were inadequate Those in the rear got the good rubber covered boots The response of the brass was to insist that soldiers change their socks regularly, and threatened to court martial anyone diagnosed with trench foot The replacement system designed by Eisenhower s staff sent inadequately trained men to the front where they often died needlessly Had they been trained as units, with experienced sergeants and sent into battle as units fewer would have died, suggests Ambrose British general Montgomery was clearlyinterested in self promotion than in becoming part of the team,, and Ambrose cites one example where Montgomery s demands foroverall command had to be personally put down by Eisenhower George Patton was obsessed with spit and polish In one instance some officers just coming from the muddy front had been ordered to Third Army headquarters to get some badly needed maps They were held up at the entrance to Third Army territory because Patton had issued orders to his MP s that anyone entering had to maintain proper uniform standards of cleanliness, etc It took the officers hours to get cleared and cleaned up before they could get what they needed, holding up the offensive Soldiers soon learned that war was not all they expected As others, like Paul Fussell and Gerald Lindeman who explored the role of the American fighting man have noted, war has been seriously overglamorized Soldiers were psychologically unprepared for battle and the stress broke many of them down Often they refused to take prisoners, shooting all Germans in the way whether under white flag or not The war fundamentally altered the lives of those who survived the front lines Americans, having never been bombed, cannot appreciate the horror of interminable artillery shelling and constant fear and deprivation Ambrose clearly admires what these soldiers for what they endured In the end, the reason for fighting the war is exemplified by the tragic comments of a severely wounded German lieutenant who desperately needed a blood transfusion Just as it was to be administered, the German insisted the medic certify there was no Jewish blood mixed in with the blood he was about to receive The medic obviously could not, but pointed out that without the plasma he would die The German died refusing to be transfused They should have given it to him anyway