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!Read Pdf õ Hiroshima Diary: The Journal of a Japanese Physician, August 6-September 30, 1945 Î The late Dr Michihiko Hachiya was director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital when the world s first atomic bomb was dropped on the city Though his responsibilities in the appalling chaos of a devastated city were awesome, he found time to record the story daily, with compassion and tenderness His compelling diary was originally published by the UNC Press in , with the help of Dr Warner Wells of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who was a surgical consultant to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and who became a friend of Dr Hachiya In a new foreword, John Dower reflects on the enduring importance of the diary fifty years after the bombing A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind A part of history we shouldn t forget, and must never repeat, told from within by the Director of a Hospital where many of the survivors later died due to the yet unknown effects of nuclear radiation In spite of being a hospital s diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and suppor A wonderful recollection of memories from one of the worst moments for mankind A part of history we shouldn t forget, and must never repeat, told from within by the Director of a Hospital where many of the survivors later died due to the yet unknown effects of nuclear radiation In spite of being a hospital s diary about such a terrible matter, the lecture is very entertaining, following the thoughts and investigations carried by all the workers and the few visitors that carried help and support, as well as some news from the rest of the world A history of devastation and desperation that leaves the reader with the feeling that humans are good by nature despite of the facts , and that human beings can do awesome things, and face any situation, with the help of hope and other people.A must read for any kind of person After the bombing of Hiroshima, the author acting as both a doctor and patient in a hospital now devoted to the victims of radiation sickness decided to keep a diary it was a personal diary, not one written with an eye to publication The attitude of the Japanese to being bombed was one I could not have imagined Within a few days there was the news that Japan had used nuclear bombs on the West Coast of America, and the cities were destroyed and that the people were either killed or suffering After the bombing of Hiroshima, the author acting as both a doctor and patient in a hospital now devoted to the victims of radiation sickness decided to keep a diary it was a personal diary, not one written with an eye to publication The attitude of the Japanese to being bombed was one I could not have imagined Within a few days there was the news that Japan had used nuclear bombs on the West Coast of America, and the cities were destroyed and that the people were either killed or suffering This cheered the patients in the hospital up immensely who wanted greater use of nuclear warheads against America They were totally devastated up to and including suicide over the decision of the Emperor to cede victory and urged him to revenge their nation, even if they all died Their thirst for revenge and anger at the Emperor were extreme Possibly their main regret was that they hadn t done it first I mentioned in the Notes on Reading that the author was an extreme misogynist He felt that the rape of a girl by soldiers was her fault and that it would be best if women just stayed at home as when they were out they were too much of a temptation to some men.Notes on reading and why I wrote this short review I never felt sorry for the bombing of Dresden Now I don t feel sorry for Hiroshima either Why is it that the victors, if they have an organised military structure, are held to higher standards and blamed for atrocities when the losers and terrorist organisations are not I really want to write a review of this book, explaining the above statement The author is a very measured scientific man, but also a misogynist of the most extreme kind.The book was excellent and very well written The sufferings of the people as radiation sickness took hold, an illness never seen before so each symptom was new and unexpected, is terrible Many died, but many recovered They were civilians, just like the Germans, but they supported the war and the cruelty of their thoughts towards the enemy, the Allies knew no bounds The title of Hiroshima Diary The Journal of a Japanese Physician, August 6 September 30, 1945 makes clear the book s content The Japanese physician, Michihiko Hachiya, is the book s author He has written in daily diary entries what exactly he experienced and witnessed starting from August 6, 1945 at 8 15 in the morning through the fifty five following days Dr Hachiya was director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital This hospital was located a mere 1500 meters from the hypocenter of th The title of Hiroshima Diary The Journal of a Japanese Physician, August 6 September 30, 1945 makes clear the book s content The Japanese physician, Michihiko Hachiya, is the book s author He has written in daily diary entries what exactly he experienced and witnessed starting from August 6, 1945 at 8 15 in the morning through the fifty five following days Dr Hachiya was director of the Hiroshima Communications Hospital This hospital was located a mere 1500 meters from the hypocenter of the bomb Dr Hachiya writes in the fashion of the academic, physician and director that he was A Buddhist and devout Japanese at heart He writes in a straightforward manner He relates what he observed with little emotion despite the fact that he had lost all his possessions, his house had crumbled, his wife was badly burned, and his own life hung in the balance Beside the deaths, chaos, trauma and physical wounds that occurred at the bomb s impact, there followed the frightening symptoms of radiation sickness that were at this time not understood Imagine being in his shoes Think about this This book depicts vividly what many in Hiroshima experienced It puts you right there You are given an eyewitness account Despite its straightforwardness, or maybe because of its straightforwardness, the reader is shaken There is an immediacy to the prose Even if the book does not contain new information to those who have read of the bombing of Hiroshima before, it is well worth reading One is struck by how individuals are shaped by the culture and the society to which they belong The Japanese people s devotion to and adoration of their emperor is hard for a westerner to fully comprehend The book goes a long way in illustrating the depth of their devotion One observes the excuses made and the explanations constructed to hold on to one s national and cultural beliefs The audiobook is narrated by Robertson Dean The narration I have given four stars It is clear, simple to follow and read at an appropriate speed Reading this book one gets uncomfortably close to the individuals there at the bombing of Hiroshima This is a difficult read but definitely worth the time and effort spent Don t miss this book Hiroshima Diary The Journal of a Japanese Physician, August 6 September 30, 1945 by Michihiko Hachiya 4 stars Hiroshima by John Hersey 3 stars Sachiko A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor s Story by Caren Stelson 3 stars The Bells of Nagasaki by Takashi Nagai 2 stars Hiroshima Nagasaki The Real Story of the Atomic Bombings and Their Aftermath by Paul Ham TBR Nagasaki Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southard TBR The Last Train from Hiroshima The Survivors Look Back by Charles Pellegrino TBR This book Hiroshima Diary is the journal of a Japanese physician, Michihiko Hachiya, M.D., who has witnessed and recorded his plights and descriptions on the aftermath of the first atomic bomb from August 6 September 30, 1945 I think those readers having read a Japanese novel Black Rain Kodansha, 2012 by Masuji Ibuse could not help comparing with it however, Dr Hachiya has written in his journal like a true academic, in other words, he has recorded everything as a matter of facts, rat This book Hiroshima Diary is the journal of a Japanese physician, Michihiko Hachiya, M.D., who has witnessed and recorded his plights and descriptions on the aftermath of the first atomic bomb from August 6 September 30, 1945 I think those readers having read a Japanese novel Black Rain Kodansha, 2012 by Masuji Ibuse could not help comparing with it however, Dr Hachiya has written in his journal like a true academic, in other words, he has recorded everything as a matter of facts, rather than emotions, as we can see from his account on the unimaginably devastating explosion impact by the atomic bomb at 8.15 a.m on August 6, 1945 Suddenly, a strong flash of light startled me and then another So well does one recall little things that I remember vividly how a stone lantern in the garden became brilliantly lit and I debated whether this light was caused by a magnesium flare or sparks from a passing trolley Garden shadows disappeared The view where a moment before all had been so bright and sunny was now dark and hazy Through swirling dust I could barely discern a wooden column that had supported one corner of my house It was leaning crazily and the roof sagged dangerously p 1 Unthinkably tinged with a chilling horror beyond words, this is not from any sci fi novel but from Dr Hachiya s unfortunate fate as reflected by his first hand account in which we should realize and keep in mind since the explosion did not only cause injury and but also radiation sickness which definitely claimed lives, sooner or later, according to its radioactive intensity Nine days later, his entry on August 15 has revealed the scene and how the victims at the Hiroshima Communications Hospital reacted to the historic radio broadcast from the Emperor Word came to assemble in the office of the Communications Bureau A radio had been set up and when I arrived the room was already crowded I leaned against the entrance and waited In a few minutes, the radio began to hum and crackle with noisy static One could hear an indistinct voice which only now and then came through clearly I caught only one phrase which sounded something like, Bear the unbearable The static ceased and the broadcast was at an end I had been prepared for the broadcast to tell us to dig in and fight to the end, but this unexpected message left me stunned It had been the Emperor s voice and he had read the Imperial Proclamation of Surrender My psychic apparatus stopped working, and my tear glands stopped, too Like others in the room, I had come to attention at the mention of the Emperor s voice, and for a while we all remained silent and at attention Darkness clouded my eyes, my teeth chattered, and I felt cold sweat running down my back The ward was quiet and silence reigned for a long time Finally, the silence was broken by the sound of weeping I looked around There was no look of gallantry here, but rather, the faces of all showed expressions of despair and desperation By degree people began to whisper and then to talk in low voices until, out of the blue sky, someone shouted How can we lose the war Following this outburst, expressions of anger were unleashed Only a coward would back out now There is a limit to deceiving us I would rather die than be defeated pp 81 82