|Book ⚖ I Have Lived a Thousand Years ♸ eBooks or Kindle ePUB free

I cannot resist the urge to compare and contrast this book with Shanghai Diary A Young Girl s Journey from Hitler s Hate to War Torn China, which I read prior to this one Both are written in the first person perspective of a young teen during the Holocaust Although their situations differed markedly, both were wrenched from their homes, stripped of personal properties, separated from loved ones and confined in inhumane situations In Shanghai, the family had chosen to immigrate to avoid maltr I cannot resist the urge to compare and contrast this book with Shanghai Diary A Young Girl s Journey from Hitler s Hate to War Torn China, which I read prior to this one Both are written in the first person perspective of a young teen during the Holocaust Although their situations differed markedly, both were wrenched from their homes, stripped of personal properties, separated from loved ones and confined in inhumane situations In Shanghai, the family had chosen to immigrate to avoid maltreatment by the Nazis Although they were not placed under armed guard, nor tortured,their existence was a constant ordeal They had the comforts of human relationships, subsistence diet and a semblance of shelter Bitton Jackson s memoir has bared the horrifying details of a young girl s experience in the sub human conditions in railway cars, work details and concentration camps.Both authors have imparted their thoughts and feelings engendering palpable visions for the reader Bitton Jackson s fear of the Nazis, her hunger and the desire to live were glaringly present throughout It was difficult to read many passages without crying for these poor victims.I have written elsewhere about my visit to the Holocaust Memorial in Washington, DC I have also gone to Yad Vashem in Israel and the Imperial War Museum in London They all have imparted similar feelings for visitors, as evident from the profuse tears seen all around me Each site exhibited shocking collections of remnants of lives once lived happily and peacefully, but stolen by the Nazis, who believed themselves to be a Superior Race I have often remarked about my gratitude for my ancestors decisions to come to America Viewing the aforementioned exhibits and reading these books reaffirms my feelings of certainty that my family would have been victims also The museum sites and these books stress the importance that this abhorrent chapter in history should not be forgotten See Those Who Save Us Livia Bitton Jackson tells her story as a young teenage child and how she survived the brutality of the Holocaust and the horrors of Auschwitz.Born Livia Ellie Friedmann in 1931 in the picturesque and sleepy town of Somorja between the Carpathians and the Danube, in a fairly religious Jewish home.At the age of 13 Ellie witnessed the invading Nazis sweeping into her town and the life of the family was turned upside down Ellie as particularly upset at her brand new bicycle being taken way by th Livia Bitton Jackson tells her story as a young teenage child and how she survived the brutality of the Holocaust and the horrors of Auschwitz.Born Livia Ellie Friedmann in 1931 in the picturesque and sleepy town of Somorja between the Carpathians and the Danube, in a fairly religious Jewish home.At the age of 13 Ellie witnessed the invading Nazis sweeping into her town and the life of the family was turned upside down Ellie as particularly upset at her brand new bicycle being taken way by the Nazis, together with all of the families positions as happened to all Jews in Nazi occupied Europe before they were deported.She describes the heart wrenching scene where she sees her father for the last time before he is deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz Ellie and her mother are later deported to Theresienstadt ghetto where they face starvation and extreme deprivation and then to the horrors of Auschwitz which she describes in horrific detail, in this factual and at the same time human and sensitive account.She describes the great suffering of the Jews in Auschwitz and the unbelievable brutality of the Nazis.She survived because a Nazi officer was intrigued by her blond hair and passed her onto the section of those who would be set to work rather than be sent straight away to be exterminated in the gas chambers.She describes her sadness, through her own starvation and suffering of seeing a consignment of small Jewish children, still pretty and fresh faced, having been newly arrived in Auschwitz and sent straight to their deaths in the gas chambers.Through her determination and series of miracles Ellie and her mother who she took great care of and rescued survived the Holocaust, as did her brother Bubi.but not before an ambush of the survivors by retreating Nazi forces after it became clear that Nazi Germany had lost the war.After surviving Auschwitz Elie looked sixty years old, according to a German women from a nearby village, who met the survivors The woman was shocked to discover that Elie was only 14 years old.After the war Elie desperately wanted to go to the Land of Israel which she knew was the only true home of the Jewish people , and that even in the USA they would really always be foreigners Millions of Jewish survivors waited for certification that they would be allowed into what was then still British ruled Palestine.But as she did not want to be separated from her family she went with them to New York instead in 1951 Even as the Jewish refugees arrived in New york the all sand Hatikvah, the Zionist anthem Sung by so many thousands of Holocaust survivors.Livia dedicated this book the the children of Israel today who unclaimed and unsung risk their lives everyday, just by travelling to school in Judea and Samaria for the sake of a secure peace in Israel the only guarantee that a holocaust will never happen again This might be one of the best Holocaust books I have read A true account of the author as a 13 year old from Hungary sent to Auschwitz and then Dachau Violent, haunting, grisly, hopeful, brave, and astonishing A lump in your throat, tears rolling down your cheeks account that makes you count your blessings Thank you Mrs Hancock and 6th grade for recommending this life changing book. I have to stop reading holocaust books The one I am reading now is a YA book, but I think it is one of the most gripping I have ever read With little details the author puts you there in the concentration camp, naked, without clothes, in the showers, having your hair shorn off, being served soup filled with white squirming worms..No other holocaust book has done this to me so grittingly I AM THERE These are not just words on a page You are equally torn when the Nazis take her ne I have to stop reading holocaust books The one I am reading now is a YA book, but I think it is one of the most gripping I have ever read With little details the author puts you there in the concentration camp, naked, without clothes, in the showers, having your hair shorn off, being served soup filled with white squirming worms..No other holocaust book has done this to me so grittingly I AM THERE These are not just words on a page You are equally torn when the Nazis take her new Schwinn bicycle, when her diploma is burned, when her new boyfriend cannot speak to her Why Because you are her Please note that the author, who is writing about herself, is only 13 years old Her home village is Samorin, near Bratislava During a year, starting from April 1944, she is in Auschwitz, Plaszow, Dachau, Augsburg Excellent, moving writing I have said enough Without a doubt, it gets 5 stars Forinformation, see the comments below After this, I need a breather from holocaust literature 31 May 2020 Re reading as Homework from Kellee ORIGINAL REVIEW4 stars.Wow Having read this in just one day, I m left rather speechless For the last 50 pages, I kept forgetting that this story was in fact a TRUE story I d read parts and the shock would hit and I d be like,how How can this have really happenedThe horror of it being true is just too much for my brain to grasp To think, and know, that so so few people survived what is possibly on 31 May 2020 Re reading as Homework from Kellee ORIGINAL REVIEW4 stars.Wow Having read this in just one day, I m left rather speechless For the last 50 pages, I kept forgetting that this story was in fact a TRUE story I d read parts and the shock would hit and I d be like,how How can this have really happenedThe horror of it being true is just too much for my brain to grasp To think, and know, that so so few people survived what is possibly one of the worst things to have ever happens, ever, makes this a really emotional read For me personally, the horror of Bibi pages 175 and 176 is what was the first part to really upset me and those couple pages I was nearly brought to tears and I had to stop reading for a bit before I could keep going And it just got worse.I ve read quite a few holocaust novels and if you have too, you will know that they all have a similarly, yet are also so different and each and everyone manages to be heartbreaking You would think that you would get use to it, but this is one part of history that I feel there is no getting use to The insanity of it having happened, it just makes me so angry aswell These people did NOT deserve what happened to them This story is just one of the stories from one survivor, but it s one that was also needed to be told The cover Well the cover is an actual photo of her as a teenager She had rescued it, saved it, and is now sharing it with the world Each survivor s story is important, and this one is definitely important I really hope that the rest of her life was a good one What sets Bitton Jackson s Holocaust memoir apart from the others is that it is simultaneously poetic and graphic Also, the entire book is written in the first person which gives it a startling immediacy.It has garnered hundreds of deservedly glowing reviews, both here and on , so I won t take the trouble of summarizing it but the following sections hit me upside the head The joyful ethnic pride she discovers in the Jewish ghetto For the first time in my life, I am happy to be a Jew What sets Bitton Jackson s Holocaust memoir apart from the others is that it is simultaneously poetic and graphic Also, the entire book is written in the first person which gives it a startling immediacy.It has garnered hundreds of deservedly glowing reviews, both here and on , so I won t take the trouble of summarizing it but the following sections hit me upside the head The joyful ethnic pride she discovers in the Jewish ghetto For the first time in my life, I am happy to be a JewThe cock feathered policement who had trampled on our sofas and our self esteem, the Gentile neighbors who were afraid to say good bye, the Jancsi Novaks, the kind, gentle friends who have not attempted to send a note of synpathy, the peasant wagon drivers who dutifully accepted wages from us for delivering us to the enemythey all are on the other side of the fence A tall fence separates us A world separates us because they do not understand But we, on this side of the fence, we understand We put up sheets around bathtubs in the yard in order to take baths We cook on open stoves, We stand in long lines for the toilet No friendship or love binds as this deep, spontaneous, easy mutuality The graphic description of concentration camp food is clearer than any I ve read elsewhere I snatch the bread from Mommy s hand she had refused to eat it and begin to eat The dry, mudlike lump turns into wet sand particles in my mouth When the bowl of food is handed to me, I am unable to take a gulp It is a dark green, thick mass in a battered washbowl crusted with dirt No spoons You tilt the bowl until the mass slides to the edge, then gulp The dark mush smells and looks repulsive The edge of the bowl is rusty and cracked and uneven with dried on smut My nausea returns in a flash And to add fodder to the eternal question of how much did war time Germans outside the SS really know about the concentration camps, there is an interesting chapter titled This Must be Heaven Some clearly astonished Wehrmacht officials running a Luftwaffe factory who have requested female laborers from Auschwitz don t recognize the arriving inmates as women, ask them where their luggage is which causes much laughter among the inmates , and ask for their actual names When one officer tells Bitton Jackson s partially paralyzed mother not to worry, that here you will get better We will take good care of you the daughter s response is I am surely dreaming A stunning Holocaust memoir, simultaneously poetic and graphic |Book ♏ I Have Lived a Thousand Years ⚖ What is death all about What is life all about So wonders thirteen year old Elli Friedmann, just one of the many innocent Holocaust victims, as she fights for her life in a concentration camp It wasn t long ago that Elli led a normal life a life rich and full that included family, friends, school, and thoughts about boys A life in which Elli could lie and daydream for hours that she was a beautiful and elegant celebrated poetBut these adolescent daydreams quickly darken in March , when the Nazis invade Hungary First Elli can no longer attend school, have possessions, or talk to her neighbors Then she and her family are forced to leave their house behind to move into a crowded ghetto, where privacy becomes a luxury of the past and food becomes a scarcity Her strong will and faith allow Elli to manage and adjust somehow, but what Elli doesn t know is that this is only the beginning and the worst is yet to comeA remarkable memoir I Have Lived a Thousand Years is a story of cruelty and suffering, but at the same time a story of hope, faith, perseverance and love The first time I visited a synagogue, it was with a group of students and Ms Livia Bitton Jackson was our teacher in Lehman College , the Bronx, New York, 1998 Ms Bitton Jackson told us the story of that pretty picture of her on the cover of the book It was a miracle She no longer had any possessions after having lived for a long period in concentration camp A time when she often shared raw potatoes secretly with the other prisoners Years after the war, she visited Poland and found a place The first time I visited a synagogue, it was with a group of students and Ms Livia Bitton Jackson was our teacher in Lehman College , the Bronx, New York, 1998 Ms Bitton Jackson told us the story of that pretty picture of her on the cover of the book It was a miracle She no longer had any possessions after having lived for a long period in concentration camp A time when she often shared raw potatoes secretly with the other prisoners Years after the war, she visited Poland and found a place where photos that had been lost by victims of the holocaust, had been preserved Looking through the pictures, accidentally she found a picture of her as a teen ager That is the picture used in this book cover I have to also share that Livia was at the time I studied with her, the woman with the most astonishing beauty As a matter of fact I don t recall having seen a woman as beautiful as her before or after having met her Her smile together with her eyes, beamed rays of joy, love and womanhoodan amazing human being. A story that you really don t want to know about BUT IT DID HAPPEN So, you must read it to help you understand what took place and how the Jews were dealt with Not a pretty picture described by Livia Britton Jackson How she and some of her family survived is unreal.I need to reread this again so I won t forget the terrible events that took place in the concentration camps. Oh My Freaking God.I have no words to describe this.